Diary Blog, 8 August 2022

Morning music

[Old Gagra, Abkhazia]

On this day a year ago

Worth reading, I think, a year on.

M.R. James

I make no apology for posting, not for the first time, the above documentary about M.R. James, finely-narrated by the late Bill Wallis. Maybe it is not quite the right time of year (autumn, or winter, might be better), but never mind.

Hard to think of a better way to spend 50 peaceful minutes on, as it might be, a quiet evening or even afternoon.

Tweets seen

Monsters, that couple— just look at them. They may be —and I mean this to be taken literally— not human. Creatures of darkness.

Cost of living crisis

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/aug/07/britain-social-emergency-leaders-political-vacuum

We are entering an era of mass fuel poverty and ‘warm banks’ – and complacent leaders have left a dangerous political vacuum.


The surreal, often absurd Conservative leadership election meanders on. Both candidates frantically float ideas for disrupting everything from university term dates to doctors’ pensions, while the Sunday Telegraph endorses Liz Truss as “the first truly philosophy-driven leader since Margaret Thatcher”, and Rishi Sunak stoically insists that he loves dancing. But we all know the gravity of the crisis that is now enveloping us, and it makes the vanities of their battle seem like some strange hallucination related to the summer’s stifling heat.

By the autumn, the victor – Truss, in all likelihood – may well be still trying to convince us that they are leading a national sprint towards sunlit uplands that only they can see. But the game is already up: the immediate future will be defined by skyrocketing energy prices, economic woe and a profound social emergency – and power will be a grinding matter of crisis management.

The unavoidable truth is that the United Kingdom is in such a fragile, frayed state that it can no longer keep its people warm or adequately feed them. Until that gnawing injustice is addressed, politics will continue to teeter into the absurd.

[The Guardian]

If only there were a credible social-national movement! If there were, we could be in power within a couple of years, and then start to do what has to be done. As it is, we are mere spectators, as the System is about to implode. We cannot, as things are, use events to bring about what we want.

Still, we may yet see the day.

More tweets seen

I was there 40-50 years ago…

Yes. Ironic, nicht wahr? Turns out that the “nazis” are and to a large extent always were the “good guys”…

The propaganda of the international conspiracy gets both filthier and more evident daily.

More music

[Shishkin, Bee Families in the Forest]

More about the police and their priorities in the Britain of 2022

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11093127/When-terminally-ill-Darrell-mooned-speed-camera-never-dreamed-lead-to.html.

[police hurry to the scene of an “antisemitic trope” (or something)]

Late tweets

See also: https://ianrobertmillard.org/2017/07/13/when-i-was-a-victim-of-a-malicious-zionist-complaint/; and https://ianrobertmillard.org/2022/01/15/diary-blog-15-january-2022-including-an-outline-of-the-failure-of-the-latest-jew-zionist-attempt-to-prosecute-me/.

Completely unacceptable.

The sick and degenerate multikultis on Twitter will think that this “cultural appropriation” is OK. We need a thoroughgoing cultural purge across the (((West))).

Ukraine, a Jew-ruled “failed state” or non-state, which without NWO/ZOG money and arms would collapse almost overnight.

Late music

[national memorial, Volgograd, Russia]

7 thoughts on “Diary Blog, 8 August 2022”

  1. Breaking news, the moronic Argentinian version of Boris Johnson, Alberto Fernandez, fell asleep at the inauguration of the Colombian president. Fernandez is the 3rd from the left and is wearing a pale blue tie, actually is easy to spot him, is the only one asleep in the photo! (LOL)

    I hope you could translate some of the comments, they are priceless (of course people are swearing at him furiously!) LOL

    Like

    1. Claudius:
      The other attendees also seem less than enthralled. One looks as if about to fall asleep, while a couple are looking at watches and telephones. Is the photo genuine?

      Like

      1. Yes, it is true, and thank you for reminding me about the others. Yes, one is looking at his watch as “how long is this going to be?”; there is another right behind Fernandez who is checking his messages on his mobile phone (LOL).

        Let’s face it, ALL these ceremonies must be awfully boring, particularly because EVERYONE knows that the speaker is lying through his/her teeth. Fancy listening to a speech by Liz Truss or John’s friend “Fishy” Rishi (LOL)

        Like

      2. Claudius:
        When I joined my chambers in Exeter in 2002, having previously been overseas and, still earlier, a barrister in London, I appeared in a case involving a contract. My head of chambers (now a Circuit Judge) was also appearing, for someone else but not against my client as such. A further member of the same chambers appeared for third parties, so was against me.

        Our closing speeches varied in length. Mine was under 20 minutes. My then head of chambers spoke for about 45 minutes. The third barrister then orated for something like 2 hours!

        After about an hour and a half, and several hints by the judge, that judge simply said to the third barrister, “are you going to be much longer?”! The barrister then had the cheek to say “no, your Honour” and yet *continued* for another 20-30 minutes…

        I admit that, on that very warm day in Plymouth County Court, I dozed off, unremarked upon but noticed (I think) by judge, other Counsel, and the sets of solicitors sitting behind.

        Incidentally, I and my then head of chambers both won our cases, with the other side losing.

        Like

      3. Dear Ian: I have to say I was shocked when I read that the other barrister spoke for 2 hours! I believe there should be a reasonable fixed time for barristers to present their cases. I think 45 minutes is more than enough. Don’t you think so?

        Like

      4. Claudius:

        In most cases (and certainly that one), yes. There are, however, some cases where to go through the evidence in summary may legitimately take 2 (or more) hours.

        Like

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