Diary Blog, 5 July 2022

Morning music

[Lazienkowskaya Palace, Warsaw]

On this day a year ago

Tweets seen

There are still a lot of rather silly, though not always elderly, people, who have decided to adopt the facemask nonsense as a kind of security blanket.

The “refugees welcome” idiots are yet another group or tribe in the UK, Ireland etc, who prefer a mental security blanket to the truth. This wish for comforting illusions is a cancer of the age.

Once-“liberal” Holland…Another “ZOG” (Zionist Occupation Government) pretending to be a “democracy”.

Mass shootings etc

I have seen on Twitter etc, the usual rash of tweets and articles saying that the USA should ban or further restrict weapons available to the public. Without getting into the detail of that, one should note that many of the “ban guns now” tweets come from the UK, which has a very different history, geography, and society to the USA. Many people in the USA live in suburbs or country some distance from immediate police assistance.

Be that as it may, I thought to repost part of a blog post first posted over three years ago, after the Brenton Tarrant attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, having seen that it attracted a few clicks today: see below:

Firearms

There are many mass shootings in the world. The USA alone seems to have one on a weekly if not daily basis (and those are only the ones which are reported heavily). The anti-gun lobby focusses on ease of access in the USA, New Zealand etc. Obviously, if a disturbed (or other) person cannot acquire firearms, then he cannot shoot people; he can, however, stab them, blow them up, drive at them etc.

Firearms events have more victims, usually. Having said that, one could say “ban cars, because some people misuse them”, to which the answer would no doubt come, “people need cars, they don’t need guns”. Well, true, though still arguable. It all depends on where society decides to draw the line. In the UK, since the late 1990s, it has been almost impossible to own lawfully-held firearms (except shotguns and, in some cases, certain types of hunting rifle). That was not always the case.

“Members of the public may own sporting rifles and shotguns, subject to licensing, but handguns were effectively banned after the Dunblane school massacre in 1996 with the exception of Northern Ireland. Dunblane was the UK’s first and only school shooting. There has been one spree killing since Dunblane, the Cumbria shootings in June 2010, which involved a shotgun and a .22 calibre rifle, both legally-held. Prior to Dunblane though, there had only been one mass shooting carried out by a civilian in the entire history of Great Britain, which took place in Hungerford on 19 August 1987.” [Wikipedia]

Note that. In the entire history of Great Britain there have only been three mass shootings, yet the government took the opportunity to ban most firearms (at which time there had only been two such events in British history), and did so with the apparent agreement of a majority, probably high, of the general public, most of whom know nothing about firearms, have never so much as seen one (other than on TV), and who were stampeded by the publicity around the 1996 Dunblane school murders.

At one time, there was little regulation of firearms in the UK:

Following the assassination of William of Orange in 1584 with a concealed wheellock pistol, Queen Elizabeth I, fearing assassination by Roman Catholics, banned possession of wheellock pistols in England near a royal palace in 1594.[73] There were growing concerns in the 16th century over the use of guns and crossbows. Four acts were imposed to restrict their use in England and Wales.[74]

The Bill of Rights restated the ancient rights of the people to bear arms by reinstating the right of Protestants to have arms after they had been illegally disarmed by James II. It follows closely the Declaration of Rights made in Parliament in February 1689.[75] The Bill of Rights text declares that “That the Subjects which are Protestants may have Arms for their Defence suitable to their Conditions and as allowed by Law”.” [Wikipedia]

British common law applied to the UK and Australia, and until 1791 to the colonies in North America that became the United States. The right to keep and bear arms had originated in England during the reign of Henry II with the 1181 Assize of Arms, and developed as part of common law.”

Starting in 1903, there were restrictions placed on purchase of certain firearms (mainly pistols), subsequent Acts of 1920, 1937, 1968 and 1988 tightening the law in other respects too.

It is worth noting that, following the two 1997 Acts, which effectively banned private possession of handguns (pistols and revolvers) and required surrender of thus-affected weapons, 57,000 people (0.1% of the population) handed in 162,000 weapons and 700 tons of ammunition! In other words, one maniac with a few weapons became the trigger (so to speak) for a law which affected at least 57,000 people all of whom had held and used their weapons peacefully until then!

I personally was not affected by the ban, though I was at one time (mid 1970s/mid 1980s) a member of the Kensington Rifle and Pistol Club in London. In the UK and/or other countries, I have fired a variety of weapons, including the 7.62 R-1 automatic/semi-auto rifle (there was a switch on the side), semi-automatic pistols including the 9mm Browning Hi-Power and numerous others in .32 and .22 calibre, and also revolvers such as the Colt .32, .38 and .357 Magnum, and have handled (overseas and mostly long ago, again in the 1970s and 1980s) others, such as the famous Uzi submachinegun and some Warsaw Pact automatic weapons. Despite that, I am not in fact particularly interested in firearms  (or any weapons) and, even in the unlikely event of the 1997 Acts being repealed, would probably not bother to join a gun club. As far as shotguns are concerned, I have used them in Ireland and in England (in England only for clay pigeon, because I disapprove of shooting birds and animals for sport or “fun”). I myself have never privately owned any firearm.

I doubt that many people now even know that there used to be public ranges in England, where for a small fee, people could take their own weapons and fire them. I went once (in 1976) to the one at Dartford (Kent), quite near what was then a (disused?) mental hospital. Now the area is probably either a housing development or perhaps might be the present Dartford Clay Shooting Club, which (I just saw on Google) seems to be at or near the same location (it is not an area that I know, though).

Most British people have never fired nor even seen a firearm and that does tend to colour their reaction.

In the USA, things are of course very different. The old English Common Law right to bear arms is written into the U.S. Constitution, though muddied by the famous words about “a well-regulated militia” etc. Leaving aside the legal and quasi-theological arguments revolving around that Amendment, it always seemed to me when I lived there (in New Jersey) that it was odd for many American states to require people to have a licence to own or at least drive a car, but not a pistol, shotgun or something even more dangerous.

In the UK, people tend to say, “look at the USA: easy ownership of guns and a massacre every week!”, but that has to be set against the fact that tens and probably hundreds of millions of Americans own firearms. Probably the vast majority have never received even the most basic training. True, there are huge numbers of crimes committed with firearms in the USA, but simply banning guns (as in some other countries) is a simplistic solution which might leave American citizens helpless. Societies differ. I met an American lady, a blonde with startlingly blue eyes, in the Caribbean. She said that she had a large silver-plated automatic pistol (I forget the marque), which she kept under her pillow. I never got to see it, by the way!

As far as New Zealand is concerned, its gun ownership laws were lax compared to the UK or even Australia, but huge numbers of New Zealanders (about 5% of the population, 250,000 out of 5 million) own at least one weapon. New Zealand is a country about 10% larger than the UK but with only about 5 million inhabitants. Much of the country is rural. There had never been a massacre there such as the one recently perpetrated in Christchurch by Brenton Tarrant.

Worth reposting, I think.

For the full post, see https://ianrobertmillard.org/2019/03/25/the-new-zealand-attack-and-related-matters/

More tweets

Late tweets

I have already said, on previous blog posts, what I think of that twerp, Vine. The cretinous interjection of the bimbo at the end of the clip really said it all, though. Brainwashed on the one hand, getting no doubt very well paid for spouting the approved propaganda line on the other.

Time for a reverse-Windrush; a whole fleet of them, in fact.

The Poundland Churchill, “second time as farce“…

Late music

8 thoughts on “Diary Blog, 5 July 2022”

  1. How moving and sad to see little babies who suffer from very bad eyesight to the point of needing glasses!

    Changing the subject; thank you for the excellent post about firearms!

    Like

    1. Claudius:
      Thank you.

      As to firearms, there are many ill-informed people who assume that the post-1996 legal restrictions in the UK are the reason why “spree shootings” are rare here. Not so. It is just a very different society to the USA.

      There have only ever been 3 such shooting sprees in the UK, at Hungerford (1987), Dunblane (1996), and in Cumbria
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_massacre;
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunblane_massacre;
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbria_shootings.

      The Cumbria shootings came *after* almost all handguns were prohibited to the public by laws passed in 1996-97.

      There have been lesser events, involving fewer people. In fact, my late father’s own colleague and several other people (his family, and neighbours) were shot dead in Surrey (south of London) by a son of the family, a teenage cadet, using his service weapon (an old British Army rifle) sometime around 1982. It probably would have been on the front pages had some other news (I forget what) not taken precedence.

      Like

    1. Claudius:
      Thank you. I had read of Konrad Heiden. He also made up the story that Hitler was so crazy that, when in a rage, he would chew the carpet! I believe that the German word is Teppichfresser (“carpet-eater”). Quite a few of the British wartime generation believed rubbish of that sort.

      Like

  2. Hello! I never heard of Sir Charles Raymond Beazley (1868-1955). He was a clever man and therefore an admirer of Adolf Hitler. Here is a fragment of a letter he sent to the “Daily Telegraph” after visiting Germany in 1934. The website is in Spanish but I am sure you can translate it with the automatic translator from Google. I tried to find the original in English but I could not.
    https://elcasopedrovarela.wordpress.com/2022/04/24/un-ingles-sobre-alemania-1934/

    Like

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