Tag Archives: wealth tax

Diary Blog, 23 January 2023

Morning music

[the Great Wall of China— what an incredible achievement]

We are now, apparently, in the Year of the Water Rabbit. I myself was born in the Year of the Fire Monkey [1956].

On this day a year ago

Tweets seen

Quite. What matters is that the people have a health regime that actually works, and which is actually available to people. The NHS is increasingly in a state where it really does not work properly.

That is not going to happen, for several reasons, but mainly because “Jack Monroe” now has only one substantial and regular source of income, i.e. the 635 utter mugs donating to her regularly on Patreon, and thus bringing in tens of thousands of pounds each month.

The propaganda is constant now, now that we are in the period 2022-2055. Look at the idea that people will be paid to turn off heating or electricity. It’s mad. The whole point of having gas or electricity is so as to be able to keep warm, use appliances etc.

…people giving a rentier-parasite maybe half their take-home pay in return for being allowed to occupy some cramped urban hutch. Sick society.

I have been, in the past (pre-2009) self-employed (as a barrister in England), employed offshore (i.e. not having to pay UK income tax), and at other times employed in the UK, paying UK income tax.

The worst of the three possibilities is when someone is employed in the UK, and having to pay UK income tax, especially when having also to pay out to rent a house or apartment, and/or commute, a fortiori when having to lay out money for a long commute by rail, perhaps even —as at times in my own case— for a long-distance First Class season ticket.

Once someone has paid income tax, he or she has those unavoidable chunks taken out: rent, travel costs, costs of suitable clothing, other costs such as lunch money etc. The last may seem small, and not everyone will have to pay for restaurants or whatever, but even a Pret or the like might add up to £5, or more, per working day, say £1,000-£2,000 a year.

No wonder many, especially on modest earnings, decide (if they can) to opt out, throwing themselves on the admittedly rather strained mercies of the State by applying for small State cash benefits, but also having most if not all of their housing costs paid, having Council Tax paid, and not having to pay out for long distance or other travel, nor for formal clothing, for lunches, and for other incidental costs. Also, of course, not having to pay income tax.

For many employed people, once those chunks are taken out of gross pay, there is not a lot left, especially when one considers that those on the lowest income levels do not pay for basic NHS dental work, or prescriptions.

Poor levels of pay in the UK are a disgrace, and poor-paying employers are having their profits underpinned via Universal Credit etc paid to employed but underpaid employees. It’s quite wrong.

In the case of a “poor” pensioner, just retired from, say, a modest or low-level job, that person will be entitled to, from April 2023, about £200 per week State Pension and Pension Guarantee Credit, Housing Benefit (if applicable), Council Tax Benefit, free medical and basic dental, various extras such as Cold Weather Payments, special one-off Treasury giveaways, free bus travel etc; the upshot being that that person might well be far better off (albeit on a low level) than he/she was the year before he/she reached State Pension age.

For younger people, the best option (especially if not paying out for rent) is to get off-grid as far as possible: do work that pays in cash or in kind, or start a small business that pays (eg car repair), use (if you can afford the capital outlay at the start) renewable heat and power via solar, pico-hydro and the like, and keep outgoings small. You do not need the often-useless “advice” of such as “Jack Monroe” to do that. Commonsense does most of the heavy lifting. Cheese rather than smoked salmon, water rather than wine.

True, that kind of “off-grid” lifestyle will not get you a Rolls-Royce, or a Mercedes SUV, or holidays in Barbados; you may have to settle for a £1,000 clapped-out estate-car, and no overseas holidays, but in return you have freedom, and that is worth rubies.

Incidentally, I am not exactly describing myself. For one thing, I am now already 66, and so beyond official “working age” anyway, but in the past have experienced almost every kind of working and non-working scenario.

So much depends on one’s own exact circumstances. For example, take the stringent rationing of the Second World War, as it was in the UK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rationing_in_the_United_Kingdom. Not everyone was equal.

Those best-off in WW2 Britain were probably not only those with money (who could pay for quite good dinners and lunches in the better hotels) but also and especially those in country houses, who might have had the money and space to stock up on tinned food (as Dennis Wheatley —https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Wheatley—had advised in his pre-war newspaper column).

Such people would have had enough land on which to grow fruits and vegetables for themselves, and might well have the possibility to shoot game birds, rabbits, hares, even deer, and also fish for trout, salmon etc. They could also easily raise chickens for eggs, despite the paucity of chickenfeed, while the rest of the population was rationed to 1 egg per week.

Anyone in a country house would quite likely also have a wine cellar, which, if replete with Claret, Burgundy or Champagne —and adapting Sam in Casablanca— “sure takes the sting out of being occupied ” [or rationed].

Today, the same applies, pretty much. Had I a country house today, I would certainly be stocking up on tinned food (which in many cases is OK almost indefinately from the safety point of view, though only at peak quality for 5 years or less). I should also be reserving at least an acre per person for vegetables etc, and would be planting, or maintaining any existing, fruit and nut trees and bushes.

I should also be filling my equally-hypothetical wine cellar. Basic or bland food tastes a lot better with a bottle of Chateau Margaux washing it down…

When my wife and I did have (a lease of) a country house (on the Cornwall/Devon border, about 20 years ago), there existed a large number of plum and apple trees, producing a quantity of fruit quite impressive, bearing in mind that they had not been maintained, pruned etc for decades.

With war again now looming on the horizon, together with social collapse, I would, were it possible, relocate back to the South West of the UK and also, were it possible, buy a country house (and follow my own advice above).

More tweets

Ha. Quite.

…and note my blog of yesterday’s date.

The floor is too low. I think that it should be somewhere around £10M. As to the percentage, probably 1%.

Early evening music

Late tweets seen

Important results.

Late music

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veselin_Stoyanov]

Diary Blog, 22 May 2020

UK “quarantine”

You couldn’t make it up! Thick-as-two-short-planks Priti Patel, posing as Home Secretary. “unveils” her great plan to save Britain from Coronavirus brought in by tourists and others:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2020/may/22/uk-coronavirus-live-news-update-covid-19-travel-quarantine-plan

The elephant in the room is why on Earth the airports and seaports were not closed long ago now, in February or March. Talk about “shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted”! It is almost pointless to do anything now.

Normally, i.e. before and maybe after “Coronavirus”, about 100,000 visitors a day enter the UK. It seems that at least 100,000 but possibly as many as 800,000 visitors have entered the UK since the “lockdown” nonsense was implemented a couple of months ago.

As to the new “quarantine” measures, how absurd they are!

Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary has already described the plans as “idiotic” and “unimplementable,” and Airlines UK said they “would effectively kill” international travel to and from Britain.” [The Guardian]

Quite. So almost all of the arrivals by air (and sea, presumably) will be asked to provide an address in the UK at which they will “self-quarantine” for 14 days, on pain of a £1,000 fine? The police will, we are told, spot-check.

This is mere window-dressing. Completely unworkable. Let us say tha, on any given day at present, 15,000 people enter the UK (that is the Government’s own figure; the true figure may be twice that number). So those 15,000 all give, on arrival, a UK address at which they will be “self-isolating”. How many of those can be checked (even once) by the police within the 14 days? 100? 1,000?

A single policeman might be able to check 10 per day, arguably. So even to check a thousand of the fifteen thousand would take about 100 policemen. To check all 15,000 (once) would take 1,500 policemen. To check those 15,000 visitors twice, 3,000 policemen, working only on that job.

The Government in fact does not claim that all will be checked, even once. They say, “spot-checked”. So will only, say, 1,000 of the (Government’s low estimate of) 15,000 daily arrivals be checked (once)? Even that seems unlikely. 100 policemen….

Indeed, what do the fines, if any are levied, do? Nothing (except add £1,000 to police or central funds). Presumably the defaulters, if any, will not (if located before their planned departure dates) be deported, which would by then be pointless anyway (and in fact all the UK’s immigration-detention facilities have been closed by reason of “the virus”, leaving the formerly-incarcerated aliens to roam around as they please).

In terms of deterring those arriving from moving around as they please in the fortnight after arrival, the proposed checks and fines are akin to drink-driving: stiff penalties if caught, but the chances are, that if you only do it once or twice, or a few times, you will not be caught.

Are these “spot-checks” and possible fines even a deterrent? A little, perhaps. What they do do, though, and severely, is to deter from visiting the UK anyone who does not have a compelling and indeed unavoidable reason for coming. I cannot see many tourists, or business travellers for that matter, coming to the UK knowing that for the first 14 days they will be cooped up in their hotels, and checked by the police at that, and fined if they have moved to another hotel (eg if the first one was not to their liking).

This “plan” is typical of thick chancers such as Priti Patel, Iain Dunce Duncan Smith (not guilty in this case, but guilty in so many others…), Little Matt Hancock etc. Not to mention Boris-idiot. These political careerist chancers have no idea. They’re hopeless.

A Virgin Atlantic spokeswoman said that with mandatory 14-day self-isolation in place there simply won’t be sufficient demand to resume passenger services before August at the earliest.” [The Guardian]

The international travel and tourism business in the UK is finished for 2020 and possibly 2021. Hotels, airlines, travel websites etc.

More “enrichment” of the UK’s (once) white Northern European society…

Pictured: Ofogeli

Ofogeli, who smirked when the jury returned their verdicts after deliberating for just under 12 hours, was sentenced at London’s Old Bailey today.” [Daily Mail]

Shocking footage of him running amok with the large hunting knife, also described by witnesses as a machete, was posted on social media.” [Daily Mail]

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8343951/Boy-17-stabbed-21-year-old-death-sentenced-20-years-jail.html

Born and brought up in Kent, not somewhere like the Congo…

Race is the root-stock, culture is the flower“…[Anon]

When we look into the future of the UK, do we want it to be an advanced, high-IQ, high-education, prosperous and cultured country, cohesive nation, and ethnostate, or do we want it to be a multikulti, bottom-of-barrel banana republic (with or without a fantasy “royal family” sitting on the peak of the rubbish-tip)?

Peter Hitchens

Some of my readers have been taken aback by my recent reposting of a large number of tweets by Peter Hitchens. This was not done because I agree with Peter Hitchens about everything, but because I agree with much of what he has had to say recently about Coronavirus, “lockdown”, economic shutdown; also, re. Government policy and behaviour.

I have blogged about Hitchens himself in the past:

https://ianrmillard.wordpress.com/2019/05/19/peter-hitchens-and-his-views/

Today, I disagree with him:

At least, I disagree with tweeter “@jona77”, above. If a “wealth tax” is “legalized theft”, then so is that amount of national economic value pumped (via governmental policy, tax policy etc over decades) into such things as, and primarily, private house values.

All but a tiny minority of those who actually have any wealth in the UK have most of it tied up in their house or houses. They themselves did not create such wealth (leaving aside improvements such as house-extensions); the wealth was created largely by the artificially-contrived expansion of value, a result of the policies of governments since, mainly, the 1970s. Margaret Thatcher turbo-charged it.

The value pumped into the real property sector in Britain has, of necessity, taken away value from other sectors.

In other words, if a “wealth tax” (which I do not necessarily support) is “theft”, then so is much of the value that might be “stolen” (taxed). I suppose that that observation is not original, not new. After all “property is theft” [Proudhon], arguably: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property_is_theft!

As someone who has been cheated, most of his life, I find myself not very sympathetic to the “plight” of the inheritees, trustafarians, buy-to-let parasites, and the sharp-elbowed and property-owning Middle Englanders who always vote “Conservative” (even after that party has changed out of all recognition).

On the other hand, I am certainly in agreement with Hitchens here:

Other tweets seen today

and from one “@Macnessie”, the (it’s becoming a tradition on this blog!) dim SNP tweet of the day:

If the SNP and some Welsh MPs do not wish to attend the Commons, that is their choice and their decision, no one else’s. They are not “barred” by the perfidious English.

A reminder of the volatility of UK politics now:

May 2019, only a year ago…amazing. Conservative Party on 12%.

Talking about the recent past…

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/austerity-public-sector-borrowing-coronavirus-boris-johnson-uk-economy-a9528106.html

I have often thought that many of the stupid actions taken by British governments over the past few decades, from joining the Common Market and abolishing police foot patrols to the destruction of the grammar schools, are so mad that they can only be rationally explained as deliberate sabotage.

The same goes for the fervent dedication of the BBC and much of the press to any cause that would undermine tradition, morality, marriage and manners.” [Peter Hitchens, in the Daily Mail]

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-6197097/PETER-HITCHENS-reveals-REAL-truth-Communist-infiltration-Britain.html

Note: The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, often described —by Jew scribblers, by the msm, by (((approved))) Wikipedia editors— as “a forgery”, is really literary fantasy, which however mirrors actual fact and real events. Poetische Freiheit or literarische Fantasie, if you like.

BannedTowerHamletsMural

Looks as though reality is slowly intruding…

Coronavirus lockdowns have failed to alter the course of the pandemic but have instead ‘destroyed millions of livelihoods’, a JP Morgan study has claimed. 

Falling infection rates since lockdowns were lifted suggest that the virus ‘likely has its own dynamics’ which are ‘unrelated to often inconsistent lockdown measures’, a report published by the financial services giant said.” [Daily Mail]

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8347635/Lockdowns-failed-alter-course-pandemic-JP-Morgan-study-claims.html

Police officers confront a sunbather in Brighton last month when the lockdown in Britain was in full force - but a new study suggests the quarantine may have had little effect

[above: toytown police in Brighton making a nuisance of themselves last month]

Musical interlude

The disastrous “lockdown” nonsense

More than 30,000 pubs, bars and restaurants may remain permanently closed because the coronavirus shutdown has sent a wrecking ball through the UK’s hospitality trade.” [The Guardian]

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/may/22/more-than-30000-pubs-and-restaurants-could-stay-shut-after-lockdown-coronavirus

So that’s about 300,000 more people on the dole thanks to Boris-idiot, “financial genius” Rishi Sunak, and the rest of the Cabinet of clowns.

Interesting film

Tweets recently seen

…and I noticed today (while in Waitrose) that that cretin, Littlejohn, was writing a rant in some trash “newspaper” about how UK beaches, parks etc should stay “locked down”. The cretin doesn’t even live in the UK anymore, but in Florida!

An incipient feeling of doom is around, despite the sun and warm weather and people flocking to beaches. A feeling of apres nous, le deluge